Pain de Campagne

13 10 2009

Tabatière shaped Pain de Camapgne

Pain de Campagne loaf in a Tabatière shape


This bread ended up being somewhat abused, but it still turned out very tasty and nice looking! I had planned out the day and while I had a meeting at school, that I was expecting to take quite a bit of time, things still ended up funky. My best estimate for when I would get home left the dough for this bread with about 2 to 3 hours left on the bulk ferment. As it turned out, I had to have my mom give the dough a quick stretch and fold for me and stick it in the fridge. But of course then things started moving fast, so it never should have gone in the fridge…

Why don’t we go back to the start… The recipe for Pain de Campagne in the Bread Baker’s Apprentice calls for a pate fermente, however, as I am wont to do, decided to make it as a sourdough (my first time making this recipe too, I always tell people not to do that). So I started the recipe out with a sourdough adaptation of the pate fermente, added some of my starter and subtracted an equivalent amount of water and flour from the recipe. I keep a stiff starter these days, I’ve found it easier to keep, work with, and get the flavor I want than a liquid starter like I used to have. Usually I put the starter in the water for the recipe and mix it fairly thoroughly to get a milky looking fluid with small bits of dough still in it.

Pate Fermente Ingredients

Ingredients for Pate Fermente

Well, the next step is obviously to mix those ingredients together! I gave them a quick mix with my dough whisk, scraped the dough down into the bowl and left it to rest for 10-20 minutes. Not quite an autolyse since the dough has salt and wild yeast, but I find it still helps to make the dough more evenly hydrated and develop the gluten.

Mixed Pate Fermente

Mixed Pate Fermente

After the rest, time to turn it out and give it a quick kneading to make sure everything is well incorporated, and it was!

Kneaded Pate Fermente

Kneaded Pate Fermente

I forgot to take a picture of this step, shame on me, but I left the pate fermente to rise until about doubled, degassed it, and stuck it into the fridge to wait for making the final dough the next day. I purposely removed it from the fridge right before making the dough as I wanted the bulk ferment of the dough to proceed rather slowly. The recipe calls for bread flour, with a small portion of either whole wheat or rye, my starter already has some whole wheat flour in it so I decided to use rye flour in the final dough.

Risen and Degassed Sourdough Pate Fermente

Risen and degassed Pate Fermente


Pain Campagne Ingredients

Pain de Campagne ingredients

As with the pate fermente, I mixed the dough loosely and let it rest for a while to incorporate.

Mixed Dough left to rest

Resting final dough

After kneading I wasn’t sure if the dough was going to get bigger than the container it was in or not, so I stuck that container without lid in another larger bowl.

Kneaded and set aside to rise

Kneaded and ready to rise

Around that picture is where I left from school, and well, I wasn’t there for the stretch and fold so no pictures of that. And I was rushing too much for most of the rest of the baking process (I was also making prebaked pizza crusts for my dad), and sending good rise vibes to the dough. What helped a little bit was putting some hot water in the larger bowl the dough bucket was sitting in, sort of a little dough sauna.

Risen Pain de Campagne

Risen Pain de Campagne


Risen Pain de Campagne

Risen Pain de Campagne

Looking through the book, I opted for 3 different loaf shapes. Auvergnat, Tabatière, and Fougasse.

Auvergnat shaped Pain de Campagne

Auvergnat shaped loaf ready to proof


Auvergnat shaped Pain de Campagne

Auvergnat shaped loaf, baked


Auvergnat crumb

Auvergnat crumb


Tabatière shaped Pain de Camapgne

Tabatière shaped loaf ready to proof


Tabatière shaped Pain de Camapgne

Tabatière shaped loaf, baked


Tabatière crumb

Tabatière crumb


Fougasse shaped Pain de Campagne

Baked Fougasse Loaf


Fougasse Crumb

Fougasse Crumb

So, for dough that really got abused with the attempted retardation, then right back out of the fridge shortly thereafter, and baking after midnight when I needed to get up early, I was really happy with how this turned out! The flavor was really amazing, the second day after it was baked it was starting to get a bit more sour than what I generally prefer, but it was still really good.

And again, submitted to YeastSpotting this is becoming quite addicting!
Bread Baker’s Apprentice Challenge


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10 responses

14 10 2009
Vicky

The one sort of reminds me of a sea shell, a conch.

15 10 2009
Noel

It does kind of, I think the shape is actually supposed to be a tobacco pouch from something I saw online?

16 10 2009
YeastSpotting October 16, 2009 | Wild Yeast

[...] Pain de Campagne [...]

16 10 2009
Lucie in Maine

Noel, I was intrigued by your Pain de Campagne on the Wild Yeast site and wanted to see your ingredients. But oh my, they are hidden away somewhere in the midst of a long narrative so I’m moving on. Before I do so, may I make a gentle suggestion?
(1) Write out your recipe-narrative as you did above. That’s the way we all think ~ from our own point of view ~ and we need to get it off our chests. (2) Now revise your narrative by focusing on what the READER wants to know: a very brief introduction followed by a stand-alone recipe in a clear format. (3) If, after that, there are still relevant items you want to include and, especially, that the reader may want to know about, go ahead.
For a great example of how to do this well, see Susan’s entries on Wild Yeast. Simplicity, clarity, reader-centeredness, and yes ~ excellent writing and a beautiful layout ~ are key reasons Susan has so many readers.
Keep up the good work and best wishes.

19 10 2009
Noel

I appreciate the comments, but as part of the Bread Baker’s Apprentice Challenge we aren’t supposed to post the recipe. If you do manage to get your hands on of a copy of the book though, you’ll find it on page 195. Or, if you have a French bread recipe you like, you can approximate this by adding 10-20% whole grain wheat or rye flour and using a levain instead of yeast (this was my own substitution, not part of the recipe.)

16 10 2009
Mimi

Great texture on all three breads! Good job!

16 10 2009
Cathy (breadexperience)

Very nice job. The textures look great! I love the Auvergnat-shaped loaf. I made the Epi and Couronne shapes.

19 10 2009
Noel

Mimi and Cathy, thanks! I really had a lot of fun with this recipe even with all the crazyness in the middle, made really delicious bread too. Yours looked really yummy too Cathy.

20 10 2009
Madam Chow

It LOOKS amazing – this is one of my favorite breads, and I’m looking forward to making it. Great post!

20 10 2009
Noel

Thanks for the kind words, it is definitely one I’ll make again. I heartily suggest using both whole wheat and rye flours for it, the flavor was wonderful.

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